More bilateral, more anterior: Alterations of brain organization in the large-scale structural network in Chinese dyslexia.

TitleMore bilateral, more anterior: Alterations of brain organization in the large-scale structural network in Chinese dyslexia.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsQi, T, Gu, B, Ding, G, Gong, G, Lu, C, Peng, D, Malins, JG, Liu, L
JournalNeuroimage
Volume124
IssuePt A
Pagination63-74
Date Published2016 Jan 01
ISSN1095-9572
KeywordsAsian Continental Ancestry Group, Cerebral Cortex, Child, China, Dyslexia, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Neural Pathways
Abstract

Abnormalities in large-scale brain networks have been recently reported in dyslexia; however, it remains unclear whether these abnormalities are congenital (due to dyslexia per se) or arise later in development. Here, structural magnetic resonance imaging data of 17 Chinese reading disabled (RD) and 17 age-matched typically developing (TD) children were used to construct cortical thickness (sensitive to postnatal development) and surface area (sensitive to prenatal development) networks. In the thickness network, compared to TD, RD showed reduced nodal network properties (e.g., degree and betweenness) in the left hemisphere along with enhanced nodal properties mainly in the right hemisphere. As for the surface area network, compared to TD, RD demonstrated lower nodal properties in the posterior brain regions and higher nodal properties in the anterior brain regions. Furthermore, hubs in both the thickness and surface area networks in RD were more distributed in frontal areas and less distributed in parietal areas, whereas TD showed the opposite pattern. Altogether, these findings indicate that the aberrant structural connectivity in the dyslexic individuals was not only due to a late developmental effect reflected in the altered thickness network, but may also be a congenital effect during prenatal development, reflected in the altered surface network.

DOI10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.09.011
Alternate JournalNeuroimage
PubMed ID26363349

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